Using a public restroom can be unpleasant (doesn’t have to be), but are toilet seat germs a deadly threat? The hand dryer might be a greater source of bacteria. If you are a business owner, be aware of the effect your restrooms have on customers’ opinions. One way to work smarter is to work cleaner.

Can You Really Catch Germs From a Public Toilet Seat?

“Developing an infection from your bottom sitting on a toilet seat is very unlikely, as most intestinal diseases involve hand-to-mouth transfer of bacteria as a result of faecal contamination of hands, food and surfaces.”
Read More

Restroom Hand Dryers Are Blowing Bacteria Everywhere

“Restroom hand dryers don’t just blow — they also suck. When they hoover up air, they also siphon in bacteria, which includes microbes carried into the room on people’s skin, and those left behind by waste after a person uses and flushes a lidless toilet. Then, after sucking these microbes up, the dryers spew them out again — in abundance, according to a recent study.”
Read More

Does Your Restroom Give a Bad Impression of Your Business?

“Nearly 70 percent of surveyed Americans say they’ve had an unpleasant restroom experience due to the condition of the facility. Survey participants listed their biggest aggravations as a lack of toilet paper and paper towels, clogged toilets, broken stall doors, foul odors, and an overall dirty or outdated appearance.”
Read More

Yelp Will Now Show You Restaurant Hygiene Scores

“Yelp announced today that the platform will start featuring hygiene scores of restaurants alongside reviews, photos, and other information. As of today, the feature is available in California, Illinois, New York, Texas, and Washington, DC, but Yelp says it intends to roll the initiative out in other states soon. Eventually, hundreds of thousands of U.S. restaurants should have their hygiene scores listed publicly on Yelp.”
Read More

On a Roll: The History of Toilet Paper and Restroom Paper Products

“The idea of a commercial product designed solely to wipe after restroom use started about 150 years ago in America. When paper products on a roll hit the market in 1890, the idea gained widespread traction and popularity, despite the fact that many consumers were embarrassed to purchase it.”
Read More