From MSDS to SDS (Safety Data Sheets)

By August 2, 2017Safety, Work Smarter

SDS - safety data sheets

OSHA revised its Hazard Communication Standard (HSC) in 2012, adopting its version of the Globally Harmonized System (GHS). Among other things, this required a switch from MSDS to SDS for information about chemicals employees might be exposed to in the workplace. Material Safety Data Sheets did not have a set format, making them inconsistent and more difficult to read and compare. Safety Data Sheets all follow the same format. Here is a collection of links providing more information about how to read, store, and use Safety Data Sheets.

From MSDS to SDS — GHS Brings Big Changes to Safety Data Sheets

“Maintaining an MSDS for every hazardous chemical and making them available to employees as part of the HCS’s Right-to-Know provisions – which says employees have the right to know about the chemicals to which they are exposed – is one of five key responsibilities employers have under the HCS.”
http://bit.ly/2u0KibU

How to Read A Safety Data Sheet (SDS)

“The information contained in the SDS is largely the same as the MSDS, except now the SDSs are required to be presented in a consistent user-friendly, 16-section format. This brief provides guidance to help workers who handle hazardous chemicals to become familiar with the format and understand the contents of the SDSs. The SDS includes information such as the properties of each chemical; the physical, health, and environmental health hazards; protective measures; and safety precautions for handling, storing, and transporting the chemical.”
http://bit.ly/2ukYwDT

The Safety Data Sheet (SDS) FAQ

“With OSHA’s regulatory updates under the Globally Harmonized Standard (GHS) which took full force in 2016 in the US, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are now called Safety Data Sheets (SDS). You will see both terms throughout this FAQ as it references various OSHA interpretation letters issued with the older term.”
http://bit.ly/2uZO2vn

The Change from MSDS to SDS

“OSHA’s HazCom 2012 rules require companies to have a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for every hazardous chemical in the workplace. The SDS sounds like the old Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), but it’s not quite the same. For the difference to make sense, you need to know some of the story behind the change.”
http://bit.ly/2vpQCNl

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